Technique

Both of my kids are creative and love to draw. That’s fun for me, since it’s something we have in common. My youngest has been bringing home pictures from school, and I’ve started to notice that he’s instinctively using techniques that a lot of people have to take an art class to understand. For example, in this picture of pancakes with whipped cream, he left white space on the page to make the whipped cream, rather than trying to draw white on top of the first layer, as most kids do.

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And in these two pictures, he pointed out to me that he made the back legs of the animals smaller “because they’re farther away.” He’s six, and I have never taught him this concept. How does he know this?

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His teachers have often commented on how artistically inclined he is for his age (and gender). I’m pretty proud.

Scarf Week: four

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It’s another infinity loop, but the pattern is more of an open, lacy look. It can be worn in a single or double loop. Pattern here. Completely unintentionally, I used the exact same yarn as the sample.

I have one more on the needles, but it’s not as quick a make and is more of the “sit down in the evening and put in a few rows” variety. Coincidentally—or not—I’ve had requests for some scarves for Christmas gifts. I’ll be starting work on those soon.

Scarf Week: three

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This is another project that I can recommend for a quick and satisfying bit of instant gratification. It’s called the “Bulky Mobius Cowl,” and if you log in to Ravelry, you can find the pattern here. It’s a single, fairly short loop, but the resulting fabric is thick and squishy for keeping neck (and face) warm and snug. With this pattern you get to learn a special mobius knitting technique too. Because the cast-on creates a mobius, you work from the middle out, knitting one side and then the other in a continuous loop. It feels like it shouldn’t work, but it does!